Ribs Turned into a Gridiron in Hell


It’s that time of year.  Not Fall, not the turning of the seasons.  Election season.

Every four years, the talking heads claim that this election is the dirtiest ever, that the language used is harsher than in years past.  That got me to thinking.  Is that true?

I’ve been reading old newspapers at GenealogyBank.com, concentrating on the Texas Revolution and Davy Crockett.  Davy was quite a character.  He had huge numbers of admirers, but also some detractors.  I’ll discuss him more in depth in later posts. Today I want to highlight this March 25, 1835 column in a Nashville newspaper.  The original thoughts were published in the Washington City Globe, under the Union section.

Davy and Andrew Jackson fought Indians together in younger days, but parted ways by 1835.  Jackson served as president 1829-1837.  Below is a transcription of the newspaper article, as I can’t post an actual picture of the copyrighted column.

“But as Davy Crockett has now become the favorite with those Nashville journals, we must expect them to repay the northern supporters of the President with insult.  They republish the letters of the Tennessee clown, who is made to father all the silly conceits which the Jack Downing letter writers of the Bank prepare, to throw ridicule and contempt on the President and the northern Republicans.  When the Nashville prints thus openly take such a person as Crockett into alliance, – a tool of the Bank who is taught to pronounce the President a tyrant and to wish his ribs turned into a gridiron in hell, &c, &c – we think that not much confidence is to be placed on their professions of friendship to the President.  And he would certainly be unwilling that those should give tone to public opinion in Tennessee, in regard to himself, who take their key note from Davy Crockett.”

Wish his ribs into a gridiron in hell.   Today these words would probably be interpreted as a death threat and Davy would already be deep in the bowels of the Secret Service.  Also see some North and South separation creeping in, and name calling on both sides.:Tennessee Clown. President a tyrant. Tool of the Bank. Such a person as Crockett.

I’ve got some more reading to do.  Talk later.

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Wordless Wednesday 7-13.


From Answers.com: On Wednesdays all over the internet, bloggers post a photograph with no words to explain it on their blog. Hence the ‘wordless’ title. The idea is that the photo itself says so much that it doesn’t need any description.  (This picture is part of my Texas note cards over at Snail Mail Notes.)

See who else is Wordless this Wednesday.

All photos and writing property of LoneStarLifer 2010.

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Wordless Wednesday 6-23.


From Answers.com: On Wednesdays all over the internet, bloggers post a photograph with no words to explain it on their blog. Hence the ‘wordless’ title. The idea is that the photo itself says so much that it doesn’t need any description.  (This picture is part of my Texas note cards over at Snail Mail Notes.)

fence1

See who else is Wordless this Wednesday.

All photos and writing property of LoneStarLifer 2010.

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Wordless Wednesday


From Answers.com: On Wednesdays all over the internet, bloggers post a photograph with no words to explain it on their blog. Hence the ‘wordless’ title. The idea is that the photo itself says so much that it doesn’t need any description.  (This picture will be part of my Texas notecards over at Snail Mail Notes.)

My father raised cattle.  He built his own fences, just like this barbed wire fence with a rustic fencepost.  When I was taking a driving photography trip this spring and saw this fence, I felt at home.

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Click here to enter your WORDLESS WEDNESDAY link and view the entire list of entered links…

See who else is Wordless this Wednesday.

All photos and writing property of LoneStarLifer 2010.

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Wordless Wednesday.


From Answers.com: On Wednesdays all over the internet, bloggers post a photograph with no words to explain it on their blog. Hence the ‘wordless’ title. The idea is that the photo itself says so much that it doesn’t need any description.  (This picture is part of my Texas Wildflower notecards over at Snail Mail Notes.)

All photos and writing property of LoneStarLifer 2010.

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Snail Mail Notes Goes Texan.


tx9

I hinted several posts ago that Snail Mail Notes was working long nights, furiously designing new product for something important (at least to LoneStarLifer).  I had the opportunity to be a part of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas convention, selling Snail Mail Notes to the lovely Daughters.  I wanted to have a large selection of Texas-themed note cards, notepads, sticky notes, magnets.  If you read my “About” page, you know I want to become a member of the DRT.  I met a nice group of ladies and found a chapter I want to join, so I hope to begin the application process with them soon.

Earlier this spring, I had the opportunity to take a trip through the Texas Hill Country and take a media card full of new pictures.  Here is some of the finished product.

allroadsThis card was inspired by all the driving I have done around Texas.  Texas signs are just such part of the Texas landscape.

blkpost The “Texas” word was painted on the side of an old building near Round Top, TX.

sfaustinpostStephen F. Austin, The Father of Texas.  This statue is in the Stephen F. Austin State Park near San Felipe, TX.

wildpost_20100504163104_00001 I had so many good pictures of Texas wildflowers that I couldn’t use just one.  I took these pictures around Independence, Brenham, Round Top, Chappell Hill, Lago Vista, Marble Falls.

paint-flat I made a series of wildflower flat note cards that can also be used as postcards.   There are seven different cards in the series.

For a more complete look at what’s new and Texan, hop on over to Snail Mail Notes and check out the Texas page.  And if you would like to buy some, I wouldn’t complain.

All writing and photos property of LoneStarLifer 2010.

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M.I.A. But for a Good Reason.


I had been trying to be more consistent with my blog writing…but have been absent the past two weeks.  Snail Mail Notes is on a growing spurt and I have been out traveling/taking pictures and  furiously designing Texas-themed product for an upcoming opportunity.  So until I can get back to writing words, here is some of what I’ve been up to.  And these new items will be on the Snail Mail Notes website soon, so YOU can buy some!

New Notecards and Postcards:

fence60 fence50
spirits

fence40

txcapcrd

starring

New Enclosure/Gift Card:

hugsresize

More to come.  Check back in later.  For now, I’m off to finish up designing.  Today is really the last day I can submit designs to the printer and get them back in time for the show.

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